The ENGINE Media Pulse

Consumer TV Consumption Sentiments and Behaviors

As the shift in media consumption continues to increase from traditional/cable TV to streaming services, the focus on CTV is more crucial than ever. But how can you cut through the clutter with your ads, and stand out amongst the CTV landscape that is getting more and more crowded? Take a look below at new findings from ENGINE’s latest Media Pulse to gain real-time insights on consumer TV consumption behaviors, including ad relevancy, interactive ads, and different viewing behaviors between generations. Also, see the insights highlighted in this Broadcasting + Cable feature.

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If you would like more information on ENGINE CARAVAN surveys, contact us below:

Contact us at caravaninfo@enginegroup.com for more information or for the full CARAVAN survey findings.

ENGINE’s CTV Hive is an always-on online community offering turnkey CTV viewer insight on advertising, products, and services, as well as rich audience understanding through video and photo diaries, guided storytelling and digital collaging.

This Online CARAVAN® omnibus survey was conducted on June 7-9, 2021. Approximately 1,000 adults selected from opt-in panels were surveyed. The results are also weighted to U.S. Census data to be demographically representative.

Written by the CARAVAN team at ENGINE Insights.

The ENGINE Media Pulse

 

You Talking to Me?

Relevancy matters and gets noticed.

Compared to ads served on traditional cable, ads on CTV do a much more efficient job providing users with relevant ad content. 49% of consumers agree that advertising/commercials on streaming platforms are relevant to them, whereas 33% of consumers agree with that statement for traditional/cable TV.

  • 49% Advertising/commercials on streaming platforms (such as Hulu, YouTube TV, Peacock, Pluto and other streaming providers) are relevant to me
    • 56% Gen Z
    • 62% Millennials
    • 44% Gen X
    • 29% Baby Boomers
  • 33% Advertising/commercials on traditional/cable TV (such as Fios, Comcast, and local cable providers) are relevant to me.
    • 52% Gen Z
    • 61% Millennials
    • 35% Gen X
    • 19% Baby Boomers

Media Consumption Quotes

  • “Some are relevant, and some aren’t. The ones that are are usually super close to what I am in need of or looking for or want. Then, there are the ones that I can’t stand that seem to show up a lot just because they annoy me. It also depends on what platform I am streaming on.” —Female, 30
  • “For the most part, yeah they’re relevant. I get a decent amount of adds for AT&T, fast food, insurance, stuff like that.” —Male, 21
  • “I would say they’re not really relevant. I know when I watch the evening news and especially ABC World News, a lot of the ads are for prescription drugs or for conditions I do not have. Some of the ads include things related to fashion or apparel and that stuff just doesn’t really interest me. I only have access to broadcast channels from the antenna, and I don’t think a lot of people my age watch Antenna TV, mostly older individuals.” —Female, 38
  • “I see more ads on Facebook that I actually pay attention to that catch my eye.” —Female, 62

Wanna Play?

Interactive Advertisements on the rise

Even though interactive advertisements are relatively new, nearly half of consumers said that they have seen/experienced an interactive advertisement.

  • 49% Replied Yes to: Do consumers remember seeing an ad that asks to scroll through different options, interacting with products, watch additional videos, or clicking in some way to interact?
    • There’s also a noticeable difference between the generations. Younger consumers like Gen Z and Millennials are more likely to recall these types of ads vs older consumers like Gen X and Baby Boomers.
      • 62% Gen Z
      • 65% Millennials
      • 47% Gen X
      • 20% Baby Boomers

Whatcha Doing?

Viewing Behaviors by Cohort

Do consumers view a full episode of a show in one viewing session? Or over multiple viewing sessions? And are they watching more than one episode in a viewing session? We took a look at this viewing behavior across the generations. (+/- compared to general population)

  • Gen Z | #Sporadic
    • 59% (-14%) Gen Z is the least likely to watch a full TV episode in its entirety in one viewing session.
    • 44% (+12%) They also are the most likely to take multiple viewing sessions to watch a full episode.
    • 65% (+2%) They are average when it comes to watching more than one episode during a typical viewing session.
  • Millennials | Couch Potatoes
    • 77% (+4%) Millennials are tied with Gen X to be the most likely to watch a full TV episode in its entirety in one viewing session.
    • 43% (+11%) They are the second most likely to take multiple viewing sessions to watch a full episode.
    • 76% (+13%) They are the most likely to watch more than one episode during a typical viewing session.
      • “I tend to watch an entire episode once I start, unless I lose interest in the show and don’t want to continue. If I break it up too much, I tend to forget what already happened, or I just enjoy it less overall. —Female, 32
  • Gen X | Middle of the Road
    • 77% (+4%) Gen X is tied with Millennials to be the most likely to watch a full TV episode in its entirety in one viewing session.
    • 33% (+1%) They are average when it comes to taking multiple viewing sessions to watch a full episode.
    • 67% (+4%) They are also average when it comes to watching more than one episode during a typical viewing session.
  • Baby Boomers | One and Done
    • 72% (-1%) Boomers are average when it comes to watching a full TV episode in its entirety in one viewing session.
    • 52% (+20%) They are also the most likely to watch more than one episode during a typical viewing session.
    • 76% (+13%) They are the most likely to watch more than one episode during a typical viewing session.
      • “In my opinion, episodes are written to tell a story and fit in one time period. Every now and then you may have episodes that are connected, but that doesn’t happen very often. I find it much easier to keep track of what’s going on with the story if I’m not distracted by other things.” —Male, 59
  • Families with Children | Always On
    • 79% Consumers with children 17 and under in the house typically complete the full episode in their single viewing session.
    • 75% Consumers with children 17 and under in the house are more likely to watch multiple episodes in one viewing session (compared to 57% for consumers who don’t have children)